Scientific Committee

Scientific Committee

Claude Delmas
Claude Delmas

Claude Delmas is CNRS research director at the Bordeaux Institute of Condensed-Matter Chemistry (ICMCB), located on the campus of the University of Bordeaux 1 in France. His current research interests deal with layered oxides and hydroxides, as well as positive electrodes for lithium and alkaline batteries. His most successful studies have involved stabilization of metastable phases and of unusual oxidation states, determination of structural derivations, and characterization of extended defects. He received his DSc degree in solid-state chemistry at the University of Bordeaux in 1976. In 1985, he became the head of the Solid-State Ionics Group at ICMCB, and in 2002, he became deputy director of the institute. He has authored or co-authored more than 200 scientific publications and holds 13 patents.

More info at: http://www.icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr/us-icmcb/presentation/introduction.html 

Imre Gyuk
Imre Gyuk

Dr. Imre Gyuk: After taking a B.S. from Fordham University, Dr. Gyuk did graduate work at Brown University where he was research assistant to Nobel Laureate Leon Cooper working on superconductivity. Having received a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics from Purdue University, he became a Research Associate at Syracuse. As an Assistant Professor he taught Physics, Civil Engineering and Environmental Architecture at the University of Wisconsin. Research interests included the theory of elementary particles, metallurgy of non-stoichiometric alloys, non-linear groundwater flow, and architectural design using renewable energy and passive solar techniques. Dr. Gyuk became an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics at Kuwait University where he organized an international Workshop on the Environment of the Arab Gulf, and was a member of the Emir’s Taskforce on Technology and the Future of Kuwait.

After six years in the Gulf, Dr. Gyuk joined the Department of Energy to manage the Thermal and Physical Storage program. Later he managed DOE's research on biological effects of electric and magnetic fields. Currently he directs the Energy Storage research program of the U.S. Department of Energy which funds work on a wide variety of technologies such as advanced batteries, flywheels, super-capacitors, and Compressed Air Energy Storage.

Ander Laresgoiti
Ander Laresgoiti

He received his undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering from the School of Engineering in Bilbao. He obtained an MS degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan in 1972, and PhD also in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 1976. In that time he worked on the influence of the first catalytic converters on the emissions of cars.

His present field of research is Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. Metallic support solid oxide fuel cell development and testing, development of SOFC fabrication methods, design and testing of the Balance of Plant and auxiliary equipment.

Since 1977 he has been a research Engineer at Ikerlan working on the development of energy efficient home appliances and HVAC systems and on the development of simulation tools for heating, cooling and energy flows in buildings. Since 1996 he has been the director of the Energy Unit. He has worked on the development of heat pumps, home refrigerators and freezers, efficient buildings, heat and power systems for houses and buildings, etc.

Petr Novák
Petr Novák

Dr. Petr Novák has been a lecturer at the Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences since 2002 and an Adjunct Professor at the Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry since 2009. Professor Novák has also been running the Electrochemical Energy Storage section at the PSI (Paul Scherrer Institut) in Villigen since 2009. 

Petr Novák completed his degree in chemistry at the Technical University of Prague (Czech Republic, then Czechoslovakia) in 1980, where he went on to obtain a doctorate in electrochemical engineering three years later. From 1983, he worked as a research scientist at the J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry in Prague for five years. 1988-1989 he worked at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the University of Bonn, Germany. 

In 1994, Petr Novák received his habilitation in chemical technology of inorganic materials from the Technical University of Prague. In 1990, he spent a year working as a group leader at the J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry in Prague. From 1991 to 1995, he was a project leader at the PSI before working as a group leader there until 2008.

John Owen
John Owen

Dr. John Owen obtained his first degree in Chemistry from Imperial College, London, where he also studied for his Ph.D. in Organic Electro-optic Crystals under the late E.A.D. White. He then worked on Solar Energy at the Materials and Energy Research Centre in Iran until in 1979 revolution brought him back to the Wolfson Centre for Solid State Ionics in Imperial College as Wolfson Fellow working on polymer electrolytes. In 1984 he was appointed lecturer in the Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry at the University of Salford before joining the School of Chemistry at Southampton in 1990 where he is now a Professor in the Southampton Electrochemistry Group and leader of the Solid State Electrochemistry Group which investigates electrode and polymer electrolyte materials for batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells and electrochromic devices.


John is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Power Sources. He has authored some 100 publications on electrochemical materials relevant to batteries and chaired the Batteries and Supercapacitors symposium of the International Society of Electrochemistry meeting in 2006. Since then he has given invited lectures on nanomaterials, high throughput techniques for lithium ion, 3D microbatteries, lithium-air batteries, in Argentina, Australia, Canada, China,  Germany, Japan,  Singapore, Sweden and USA. He is a co-founder of Nanotecture PLC, a spin-out company of the University.

Steven Visco
Steven Visco

Dr. Steven Visco is a Principal Investigator in the Materials Science Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Visco graduated with a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Massachusetts in 1977 and received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Brown University in 1982. Steven spent two years as a Postdoctoral Scientist at the University of California at Santa Barbara working on the research and development of solid electrolytes for advanced batteries. Dr. Visco then joined the staff at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a Principal Investigator in the Materials Sciences Division in 1984 where his research interests have included solid state ionic devices such as batteries, fuel cells, ionically conductive ceramic membranes, and electrolytic gas separation. Steven Visco is also cofounder and Vice President of PolyPlus Battery Company in Berkeley California. In 1990 Steven Visco cofounded the PolyPlus Battery Company, based on technology developed at LBNL, a California Corporation in Berkeley. Dr. Visco serves as Vice President of Research at PolyPlus. Dr. Visco has published over 75 articles in scholarly journals, and holds more than 50 issued U.S. patents (and 40 foreign patents).

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